Animal Studies with LDN

Oct 4, 2018

The effect of naltrexone as a carboplatin chemotherapy-associated drug on the immune response, quality of life and survival of dogs with mammary carcinoma.


“This study represents the first description of naltrexone use in veterinary medicine as a chemotherapy-adjuvant treatment in female dogs with mammary carcinoma. Results of this study demonstrate that naltrexone reduces the side effects related to carboplatin chemotherapy.”

Abstract.


The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-dose naltrexone (LDN) as a carboplatin chemotherapy-associated drug in female dogs with mammary carcinoma in benign mixed tumors (MC-BMT) after mastectomy and to assess its association with quality of life and survival rates. Sixty female dogs were included in this study, all of which had histopathological diagnosis of MC-BMT and were divided into three groups: G1 (control), consisting of animals submitted only to mastectomy with or without regional metastasis; G2, composed of treated animals that did not present with metastasis; and G3, treated dogs that presented with metastasis. G2 and G3 were also subdivided according to the treatment administered: chemotherapy alone (MC-BMT(-) C/MC-BMT(+) C) or LDN and chemotherapy (MC-BMT(-) C+LDN/MC-BMT(+) C+LDN). All animals were subjected to clinical evaluation, mastectomy, peripheral blood lymphocyte immunophenotyping, beta-endorphin and met-enkephalin quantification, and evaluation of survival rates and quality of life scores. The results showed higher serum concentrations of beta-endorphin and met-enkephalin, fewer chemotherapy-related side effects, and better quality of life and survival rates in the LDN-treated groups than in LDN-untreated groups (P < 0.05). Evaluation of clinical and pathological parameters indicated a significant association between the use of LDN and both prolonged survival and enhanced quality of life. These results indicate that LDN is a viable chemotherapy-associated treatment in female dogs with MC-BMT, maintaining their quality of life and prolonging survival rates.


Conclusions

This study represents the first description of naltrexone use in veterinary medicine as a chemotherapy-adjuvant treatment in female dogs with mammary carcinoma. Results of this study demonstrate that naltrexone reduces the side effects related to carboplatin chemotherapy. Naltrexone treatment increased beta-endorphin and met-enkephalin serum concentrations, improved the animals’ well-being, maintained their quality of life, and contributed to an increased survival rate in dogs undergoing chemotherapy, thus making LDN adjuvant treatment an important tool in the clinical management of mammary tumors in female dogs.

Full paper available:

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0204830

 
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Immune Therapeautics, Inc. © 2017 | All Rights Reserved | 2431 Aloma Ave #124 Winter Park, FL 32792 | 1-888-613-8802